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ADV Sample Teams

Discussion in 'ADV OU' started by CALLOUS, Jan 19, 2020.

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  1. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Leader

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    **WORK IN PROGRESS**

    Smogon has had sample teams for a long time, but I wanted to take it a step further. I believe one of the biggest problems we face in our goal of continuously growing the competitive Pokemon community, especially in old gens, is barrier to entry. There are guys who have been playing these gens for over a decade. How does someone starting from scratch ever catch up? There's so much to learn. It's intimidating. It's overwhelming. Sample teams are great for giving someone a starting point, but just slapping together a copy/paste and handing it to a new player doesn't solve anything. That's more or less the same as handing someone a saddle and the reigns of a horse and telling them to ride. Could just about anyone learn how to do it? Absolutely. Is it something most people would be able to just pick up and do on their own? Absolutely not. It's the same concept here. Explanations and instructions are needed, as new players are not going to understand what they're looking at or why things are the way they are. Likewise, outdated information, even if it was once helpful, is actually detrimental to a player just starting out. This is my way of addressing these problems. I've asked a handful of very high level, experienced, proven tournament players not only to provide some fairly beginner-friendly teams, but also to provide some information about them so a player wanting to pick these up and try them might have a better idea as to what it is they're supposed to be doing. We'll also be reviewing these twice per year and filtering out outdated teams and replacing them with more current ones. Please take advantage of this opportunity to learn from some of the greats of the game and get a jump start on your competitive Pokemon journey!

    Standard Physical Offense
    Pasy_g


    Zapdos @ Leftovers
    Ability: Pressure
    EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
    Modest Nature
    IVs: 2 Atk / 30 SpA
    - Thunderbolt
    - Hidden Power [Grass]
    - Baton Pass
    - Protect

    Snorlax @ Leftovers
    Ability: Immunity
    EVs: 16 HP / 168 Atk / 136 Def / 176 SpD / 12 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Body Slam
    - Earthquake
    - Shadow Ball
    - Self-Destruct

    Metagross @ Leftovers
    Ability: Clear Body
    EVs: 248 HP / 240 Atk / 4 Def / 16 SpA
    Brave Nature
    - Meteor Mash
    - Earthquake
    - Hidden Power [Grass]
    - Explosion

    Swampert @ Leftovers
    Ability: Torrent
    EVs: 252 HP / 216 Def / 40 SpA
    Relaxed Nature
    - Earthquake
    - Ice Beam
    - Hydro Pump
    - Protect

    Magneton @ Leftovers
    Ability: Magnet Pull
    EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
    Modest Nature
    IVs: 2 Atk / 30 SpA / 30 Spe
    - Thunderbolt
    - Hidden Power [Fire]
    - Toxic
    - Protect

    Tyranitar @ Lum Berry
    Ability: Sand Stream
    EVs: 212 Atk / 44 SpA / 252 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Dragon Dance
    - Earthquake
    - Rock Slide
    - Ice Beam

    This is a basic physical offense team. Magneton is on the team to trap Skarmory and act as a (very) soft check to Gengar which can generally be difficult for physical offenses thanks to its Will-o-Wisp spam. Hidden Power Grass Metagross aims to weaken Swampert and can blow up on bulky Waters (Suicune, Milotic) to further free up the game for a Tyranitar sweep. Snorlax is a really basic choice for physical offenses since it acts as a great check for all kinds of special attackers, switches into a lot of waters and is almost guaranteed to punch a hole in the opposing team between its paralysis chance, Earthquake + Shadow Ball coverage (Tyranitar/Metagross/Jirachi and Gengar respectively) and the threat of, ideally, damaging or killing a physical wall with Self-Destruct.
    Zapdos prevents early Spikes, acts as a switch-in for Swampert (and threatens to kill it) and also acts as a momentum gainer via Baton Pass to position Snorlax and Metagross against special walls in order to chip away at incoming physical walls.
    Swampert is the defensive backbone of the team and is needed in order to not get rolled over by Dragon Dance Tyranitar and Salamence, while generally acting as a switch-in for other physical threats like Metagross too.
    Tyranitar acts as a late game sweeper and can clean up a lot of games if set up properly. The team doesn't really give Flygon a lot of good switch-in opportunities and therefore does not go out of its way to bait it out and kill it. Instead, it focuses on beating down all other Pokemon that can stop a Tyranitar sweep, which is why we put Ice Beam on it. Ice Beam can also come in handy against Salamence and sometimes other Pokemon too such as Zapdos or Aerodactyl so you don't have to risk a Rock Slide missing. The Lum Berry is intended to give Tyranitar more opportunities to set up, especially against Thunder Wave from Zapdos or Blissey, but also can help with beating Gengar, though it should be noted that Gengar will often still be faster than Tyranitar even after a Dragon Dance.

    Mixed Heavy Offense
    Gacu


    Zapdos @ Leftovers
    Ability: Pressure
    EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
    Timid Nature
    IVs: 2 Atk / 30 SpA
    - Thunderbolt
    - Thunder Wave
    - Hidden Power [Grass]
    - Baton Pass

    Swampert @ Salac Berry
    Ability: Torrent
    EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
    Timid Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Hydro Pump / Surf
    - Ice Beam / Roar
    - Substitute
    - Endeavor

    Snorlax @ Leftovers
    Ability: Immunity
    EVs: 16 HP / 248 Atk / 116 Def / 116 SpD / 12 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Body Slam
    - Shadow Ball
    - Focus Punch
    - Self-Destruct

    Metagross @ Choice Band
    Ability: Clear Body
    EVs: 112 HP / 212 Atk / 184 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Meteor Mash
    - Earthquake
    - Rock Slide / Double-Edge
    - Explosion

    Tyranitar @ Lum Berry
    Ability: Sand Stream
    EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
    Jolly Nature
    - Dragon Dance
    - Earthquake
    - Hidden Power [Bug]
    - Rock Slide

    Salamence @ Leftovers
    Ability: Intimidate
    EVs: 4 Atk / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
    Rash Nature
    - Dragon Claw / Rock Slide
    - Fire Blast
    - Hidden Power [Grass]
    - Brick Break

    This is a fast offensive team not meant for long games. It features a bunch of naturally bulky hard hitters that are versatile to the point where their roles can be swapped without too much fuss. For example, I could have gone with LureTar (Fire Blast/HP Grass/Ice Beam/Brick Break) and Dragon Dance Salamence instead. That versatility is one of the most dangerous aspects of this team as it can keep opponents on their toes and force them to keep the correct counters healthy in order to not get swept.

    When playing the team you sometimes need to double or even triple switch to put yourself in best position possible. This might be for scouting purposes, to set up sand or to get a specific Pokemon in so you can use Explosion on it or attempt to set up one of your sweepers on it.

    This team requires prediction skills and most of the time you can't just attack what's in front of you. It's often better to aim to hit their switch-in for super effective damage instead. Sometimes this means taking a shot in the dark, but if you are good at reading team compositions it becomes significantly easier to deduce what your opponent might have in the back and what they're likely to do.

    On the defensive side you need to pivot around certain threats and you cannot afford to allow opponents to begin setting up. The team doesn't have any inherently bad matchups as a whole, but as with most heavy offense teams there are a few particular Pokemon, such as offensive Starmie, Gengar, Milotic, Zapdos and opposing mixed Mence, that can be problematic.

    Zapdos is the optimal lead here because it matches up well against most other common leads (Skarmory/Metagross/Suicune/Salamence), can TWave opposing Zapdos which is otherwise a pain and simply Baton Passes out against Tyranitar (to Metagross or Swampert).

    Baton Pass in general can be huge for keeping momentum mid game, getting your hard hitters into opposing special walls. Zapdos can sometimes clean up in the late game once opposing special walls are out of the way.

    Swampert is far more common than Flygon these days and is likely more difficult as well and as such I've opted for HP Grass as opposed to Ice on Zapdos. I have other ways to deal with Salamence and Celebi and don't see a lot of need for Ice.

    Max Speed is necessary on an extremely offense-minded team as is max Special Attack.

    Endeavor Pert is a versatile, powerful threat. It can act as a early game wall (it can switch into Tyranitar/Metagross/Salamence once or twice), mid game breaker or even late game sweeper if opposing Pokemon with recovery moves are down.

    Snorlax is the go-to special wall on mixed offense. Defensively it deals with most of the aforementioned special attackers that otherwise are very difficult for you. You have very few other answers for these Pokemon. It's better than Blissey would be on a team like this because you cannot afford to give up momentum or carry any Pokemon that isn't an offensive threat.

    Body Slam is a solid STAB attacking option and the paralysis chance is great on this kind of team. Shadow Ball is for Gengar. Focus Punch can catch Tyranitar on a switch-in, which is absolutely backbreaking when it happens, and it also pressures Skarmory. By making it so every single Pokemon on the team can meaningfully damage Skarmory we're not forced to carry Magneton or a Rapid Spin Pokemon. The Speed on Snorlax makes it so we're faster than a paralyzed Aerodactyl and possibly faster than opposing Snorlax too. Otherwise, we went heavy into Attack because this is not a Rest Lax; we want it doing as much damage as possible- it isn't built to last.

    Because our Swampert isn't the defensive pivot it usually is on other teams we need a second Rock resist and that's where Metagross comes in. With Choice Band all of its attacks hit incredibly hard if you're able to predict correctly and of course Explosion can take out a key wall, probably a bulky Water, and enable another one of your Pokemon to clean up. These speed EVs allow you to outspeed Adamant Tyranitar and most Swampert, Milotic and Suicune. The HP investment allows you to live Fire Blast from special-based variants of Salamence or Tyranitar while still giving you a good shot at living +1 Earthquake from the Dragon Dance variants of the two.

    Our Dragon Dance Tyranitar is our sweeper/cleaner and it's the best in the tier at what it does. Hidden Power Bug nails Claydol and Celebi, who would otherwise be relatively safe against your other attacks. Max Attack and max Speed simply allow this Pokemon to be as dangerous as possible. With its Jolly nature, this particular Tyranitar will outspeed many things at +1 that an Adamant Tyranitar would not, which is often crucial. Lum Berry allows you to set up against Thunder Wave users or, in an emergency, Gengar.

    Salamence is an aggressive cleaner with excellent coverage and it adds to the overall theme of pressure and aggression that this team lives on. Defensively it's our best bet against Heracross. It is, like the rest of the team, simply EVed to be as fast and dangerous as possible.

    Milo/Dol TSS
    Zokuru


    Tyranitar @ Leftovers
    Ability: Sand Stream
    EVs: 184 HP / 196 Atk / 120 Def / 8 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Rock Slide
    - Earthquake
    - Hidden Power [Bug]
    - Roar

    Milotic @ Leftovers
    Ability: Marvel Scale
    EVs: 248 HP / 212 Def / 48 Spe
    Bold Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Surf
    - Toxic / Mirror Coat
    - Recover
    - Refresh

    Blissey (F) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Natural Cure
    EVs: 40 HP / 244 Def / 208 SpA / 16 Spe
    Bold Nature
    - Seismic Toss
    - Ice Beam
    - Thunder Wave
    - Soft-Boiled

    Skarmory @ Leftovers
    Ability: Keen Eye
    EVs: 248 HP / 236 SpD / 24 Spe
    Careful Nature
    - Drill Peck
    - Toxic / Protect
    - Spikes
    - Roar

    Claydol @ Leftovers
    Ability: Levitate
    EVs: 224 HP / 228 Atk / 36 SpA / 20 Spe
    Adamant Nature
    - Earthquake
    - Psychic
    - Refresh
    - Rapid Spin

    Dugtrio @ Choice Band
    Ability: Arena Trap
    EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
    Jolly Nature
    - Earthquake
    - Aerial Ace
    - Hidden Power [Bug]
    - Screech

    This is one of the most reliable, resilient stall teams out there. Skarmory + Blissey is a classic, tried and true defensive core that shuts off a plethora of threats and forces switches, which is exactly what you want to be doing when you're a Spikes abuse team. Dugtrio is crucially important to this team. It eats Magneton if your opponent has one for your Skarmory, it deals with threats that would otherwise be really problematic such as Heracross and Celebi and it provides another layer of Dragon Dance Tyranitar insurance.

    Claydol is probably the most reliable spinner in gen 3 and that's its main purpose here. It has Refresh so it can sit in indefinitely against Skarmory that don't have Drill Peck and it also removes Toxic or Will-o-Wisp it may catch on the way in from a Zapdos or a Gengar respectively. Milotic and Claydol together, with their solid type synergy and their ability to check each other's counters, provide yet another layer of sturdy defensive backbone to the team. Tyranitar adds a much needed physical presence as well as a non-trappable phazer. Sand is also mandatory for making threats like Snorlax and Suicune manageable. These Pokemon would otherwise be too bulky to handle.

    When piloting this often times the best play is the most patient and conservative one. If you play patiently you should almost always have the advantage over time. With this team it's definitely a marathon and not a sprint. Against smart opponents sometimes double switches or aggressive Dugtrio switches are needed to take out key Pokemon, but in most situations playing safe and smart is the way to go.
     
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