1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Welcome to Pokemon Perfect, Guest!

    Our motto is Pokémon Practice makes Pokémon Perfect. We are a competitive-battling community that encourages the development of players and their ideas, and fosters positive and respectful attitudes. We love Collaboration (working together), Competition (getting stronger), and Communication (being informed).

    You are free to post everywhere, unless the thread explicitly states otherwise (usually in the case of a vote), and there are no private forums whatsoever. We just require you to not make multiple accounts. Let us greet you by posting a thread in the Introduce Yourself! forum.

  3. Tiers

    View Introduction to Tiers if you don't know what tiers are. Pokémon Perfect tiers are named differently to those on Smogon. A numeral followed by the letter U, e.g. 1U, 2U, 3U, represents a main tier on Pokémon Perfect – the '1' of '1U' representing the tier level. For a tier to be a main tier, it must be balanced (nothing is too powerful and game-breaking) and diverse enough (include a variety of Pokémon and strategies). A numeral followed by the letter P, e.g. 1P, 2P, 3P contain all Pokémon that are deemed overpowered in the respective 1U, 2U, 3U tiers. The 1st tier level allows Pokémon that are banned in the 2nd level, and this process continues down. Read the tier list, and in-depth explanations of the tiers naming system and tiering system. Also check out our analyses for all tiers.

  4. Tournaments

    RBY 1U Seasons and its master tournaments are responsible for starting up the community, and tournaments continue to play a big role in maintaining interest in the forums. Signups Open gives you a list of tournaments you can join, and Ongoing lists tournaments that you might want to follow. Additionally, you can tap to find out approximate Schedules for tournaments.

    For historical threads, check out Signups Closed, Finished tournaments and Results. We also have Nominations, Voting and Event threads for exhibitions – past and present.

Community Tutoring Program Discussion

Discussion in 'Pokémon Tutoring' started by Disaster Area, Apr 11, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I was talking about this today a bit with Lutra. It would be great for PP to have a tutoring program. I want to hear about your experiences as a tutor or as a tutee in Smogon or PO's tutoring programs, and I want to hear how they do things right and where they can be improved upon. All feedback and ideas are welcomed!
     
    musicaltide likes this.
  2. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    Posted this in the PP discord, got this response:

    Genesis7-Today at 1:51 AM
    I think a tutoring program would certaintly work but don't put any time constraints around it and only pick VERY qualified people to tutor
    that's what demolished the smogon system
    they just let anyone tutor

    ---

    My quick thoughts on what he said: maybe we could use a certain level of achievement in the seasons as a part of the qualification system for becoming a tutor.
     
    Linkin Karp likes this.
  3. Lutra

    Lutra Site Founder Owner

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,076
    Likes Received:
    309
    I think tournament achievement, activity and how well they can engage with a number of different tutees should ideally be assessed in tutors. Feedback from both tutees and tutors would be good, perhaps both privately and transparently. Either way people need to know what expectations to meet to get the best out of it.
     
    Disaster Area likes this.
  4. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    Some of you may know this and others may not, but I was a PO tutor for ADV OU for quite a while. I worked with about half a dozen tutees quite thoroughly and I believe it went remarkably well.

    The key thing with this, as already mentioned, is being very selective about who is allowed to tutor. Keep in mind- if two people want to work with each other anyone can choose to work with anyone without it being an "official" thing- so if you think you have stuff to teach and there's someone out there who is asking you for help and wants to learn from you then by all means, do it.

    As far as OFFICIAL tutoring, however, it needs to be far more selective. Smogon lets just about anyone tutor and that's why that program ultimately failed. PO was pickier about the QUALITY of the players tutoring, which is good, but being a talented battler is only one of many qualities required to truly be a good tutor. You need to be genuinely excellent at and knowledgable about the tier you're teaching. You need to be calm and patient. You need excellent communication skills. You need to be active. You need to be reliable/responsible/available so you can realistically commit to a set number of times each week and actually show up for those times. And it needs to be about helping someone else and genuinely wanting to see them succeed, not about feeding your ego.

    Now, the sticky part, because many of us have pride and egos and think we're good enough to teach others... I think a very significant portion of Pokemon players- the very large majority- believe themselves to be better than they actually are. As such, it's a natural reaction to be offended, defensive, etc. if you're told you're not good enough to be a tutor. Many people are very nice, non-confrontational, passive, etc. and would have a really hard time saying no to someone- especially someone very nice- even though they know in their mind that person probably isn't good enough for the job. Here's one possible approach to ease that issue-

    What if each tier in which we're offering tutoring had a "vote council"? This group would be small- I think 5-7 people is the ideal number- and would have PROVEN EXPERTS who know the tier and know the community only. Let's say, for example purposes, we're talking about RBY. The PP vote council could be Disaster Area, Lutra, Lusch, Marcoasd and Peasounay. When someone applies to be a PP RBY tutor, the council leader for that tier (let's say Disaster Area just for example purposes) would instruct the members to be strict/picky/selective and then they'd take a vote- with who voted yes and who voted no being anonymous to the public- as to whether or not the applicant is qualified to be a tutor. Then, the council reports their results (example- we've voted 4-1 in favor of allowing GGFan to be a tutor but never specifying who in the group voted yes and who voted no). By doing this, it allows people to vote truthfully and do what they actually feel is right without the fear of confrontation or being harassed by someone who does not like or agree with their vote. In a 5 man council at least 3 if not 4 yes votes should be required to be accepted. In a 7 man council 5 yes votes should be required to be accepted. We could assemble a group like this for each tier and ensure only quality applicants are allowed to tutor.

    Secondly, someone should be on top of making sure tutors are active and fulfilling their obligations. It should NOT be once someone is a tutor they're a tutor forever pending they step down or something disastrous happens. Instead, someone should be checking in to make sure things are progressing as intended. On PO we had to post LOGS of our sessions with tutees, which I think is over the top and unneccesary, but I think there should be frequent communication between tutors, tutees and whoever's job it is to check up on these things. Communicating when scheduled sessions are, the general concept of what you went over in those sessions and the progress that is being made would be a nice starting point.

    Third- and very importantly- the tutee should have the opportunity to review their tutor without the fear of repercussion. Once the pairing has run its course and the tutoring between the two is done, the tutee should have the opportunity to give feedback. Was the person easy to work with? Do you feel they actually taught you things and knew what they were talking about? Did they show up when they said they would? How was their attitude? Obviously if someone is getting consistently poor feedback the vote council should get involved. I think it'd be reasonable at this point for the council to vote on whether or not this person should continue tutoring. I also think there should be a hard and fast rule somewhere- if you ask tutees, overall, if their experience was more positive or negative- I think after 3 times, for example, of a tutee reporting negative the tutor should automatically be stripped of their position.

    Finally, I think there should be a max number of tutors at any given time in any given tier. There IS such thing as too many. We should be constantly reviewing the work and progress of each individual tutor and should be actively cycling people out over time as they become inactive and/or start getting poor reviews.

    This whole process is a TEAM and COMMUNITY effort and it will be best for everyone involved if there is a group of people, rather than one or two individuals, invested into making this program what it should be.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
  5. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    This is a pretty good list to go by.

    I like the idea of this a lot.

    So that's selection addressed. The next thing to address is how to make the process work effectively.

    Agreeing logs are a bad idea: losing the needle in the haystack that way. Maybe best thing to do is after each session to post a bullet-point summary?

    Nice overall ideas, I like the core idea of this.

    That's an interesting idea. I think to some extent this depends on demand and depends on the size of the forum.

    So long as people don't end up in a position where everyone thinks something is "somebody else's problem", I agree.
     
    CALLOUS likes this.
  6. PhilosopherKing

    PhilosopherKing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    125
    I think there is an association that is often made beteeen entering a tutoring program and being completely new to the tier in which you are being tutored. While largely true, there are people like me who are pretty experienced in the tier but want to take themselves to that next level.

    One way Pokémon Perfect could stand out from other tutoring programs is by offering various levels of instruction in a given tier. It could look something like the following:

    Beginner: You are completely new to the tier or have little experience and want to master the basics.

    Intermediate: You know the basics but want to go deeper. This course will teach you the finer points of competitive battling and teambuilding in the tier.

    Advanced: You are good at the tier, and you know it. However, you struggle to reach that next level of premier competition for one reason or the other. This course will focus on the most technical aspects of competitive battling, strategy, and teambuilding in the tier.

    Obviously, the differences between the different course levels will need to be more fleshed out, but you get the basic idea. Essentially, the tutoring program should be as inclusive as possible while also offering focused instruction. Offering options to enroll in separate programs in a tier will ensure that students get the kind of guidance they need, and tutors will not get overloaded and will instead be able to focus on one group of people with a common set of needs. In other words, there would be one tutor for each course, and three tutors for a single tier. For example, there would be one tutor for ADV Beginner, one for tutor for ADV Intermediate, and one tutor for ADV Advanced.

    Establishing this kind of system would be a golden opportunity for Pokémon Perfect to do something unique and be a center for producing high quality players as a result.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
    Cowboy Dan, Enigami, CALLOUS and 3 others like this.
  7. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I want to comglomerate all of the information so far into a cohesive proposal. Let me break things down into several categories:

    Determination of tutors

    Clearly, from the responses in the thread, people prefer quality over quantity.

    CALLOUS provided a good list of traits desired in a tutor:
    1. Tier and Metagame Knowledge
    2. Patience and Temperment
    3. Communication Skills
    4. Activity and Reliability
    5. Enthusiasm for helping others
    I modified it and cut it down for clarity.

    I also support the idea of a council for determining who can become tutors. Let's call them each "[Tier] Tutoring Council" (e.g. RBY 1U Tutoring Council). 5 or 7 people on it, who each vote anonymously. If there are council votes against the user, then the user should be told on which of the 5 areas the council felt they were lacking in, to help them improve. Furthermore, I propose that if a player makes it through the process, then a second vote is conducted to determine up to what level of instruction they are permitted to instruct at.

    I think these descriptions are very suitable.

    I think that the thread where potential tutors sign up should just be permanently open, so players can apply any time.

    Assignment of Tutees

    I haven't thought about the logistics of this yet. Opinions here would be very much appreciated.

    Tutor Review

    This covers a couple of apsects:
    • Tutor reporting on the tutoring sessions
    • Tutee feedback
    The first part is easy to do: Tutors should have to provide a brief summary (a few bullet points) after each session.

    The second part we could do with some more discussion as to how best to do this.
    • Should some element of public feedback be involved?
    • How should the private feedback work?
    • Should we provide a standard set of questions to suggest things to discuss in feedback? What should they be?
    • At what point should the council get involved to remove a tutor from a tutoring position?
    Forum Management

    I just want to briefly discuss this too. It is currently our policy on Pokemon Perfect to have no private forums whatsoever. This could possibly change in some way if people think it is for the best, but we have it because we value transparency and want to reduce (at least, unearned) elitism. Besides this, it is a good question to ask: what forums would we need for our Tutoring program (clearly we need at least 1; what should it / they be called?) and as a consequence how do we organise the process?
     
  8. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    I hesitate about the beginner/intermediate/advanced thing. Wonderful on paper but not so hot in practice. For example, if someone is good enough to teach the beginner course but not the intermediate course, should that person really be tutoring? Shouldn't EVERY tutor be able to teach to AT LEAST an intermediate level? Furthermore, if you're teaching a genuine beginner and starting near the bottom, shouldn't they be learning the "right" way as opposed to from someone only qualified to teach beginners or intermediate players? I definitely see problems here. As far as I'm concerned if someone can not extremely comfortably teach someone else to at least an intermediate level they should not be a tutor.

    Regarding the pairing of tutors and tutees, I don't see any problem with qualified tutors who have already been through the selection process simply choosing for themselves who they'd like to work with among the interested applicants. Is there a reason not to do this? Besides, I'm sure several tutors will sign up for "I'll work with anyone" and in those cases we can create matches either randomly or in the order in which people signed up. People who signed up first/waited longer should have the first opportunity.
     
  9. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I mean I think that makes sense: all tutors should be able to teach at at least the intermediate level.

    I mean should we have 'cycles' like PO and Smogon do for tutees? Or a thread which is permanently open? When should tutees be assigned? Those are the sorts of questions: it's not hard to decide who should work with who, the challenge is more about what should the process be: when should threads go up, when should decisions be made, and so on?
     
  10. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    Replying to the second part, I'd say step one is establish initial tutors for each tier, with each tutor designating a numeric maximum number of tutees they're comfortable having at any given time.

    Step two is to have open signup for those who would like to be tutored. If they'd like to request a specific tutor they can do so and if the tutor is fine with it you've got yourself a match. If not, that's fine.

    Step three pair the tutors with tutees. Tutors that are picking their own can do so among the pool. Tutors and tutees that both said they'll work with whoever get paired by the council. Load a tutor up til they're at their previously designated numeric maximum. Of course, for some people that number will be 1. Repeat this process until all tutor open slots are full.

    Step four when a tutor pairing ends, and the tutor has passed the review process and wishes to continue tutoring, go back to the signup sheet and find them a new tutee.
     
    Disaster Area likes this.
  11. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    That all sounds peachy to me, what do others think?
    How long should a pairing last?

    ---

    Also one thing is I don't think it's too bad to have plenty of tutors particularly in the case where there's a variety of timezones. Say if we had someone from the Americas, someone from Europe, and someone from Aisa or Australia, the wide coverage of timezones helps. Also the fact that the tutors may speak additional languages is maybe something we can use to our advantage too? Say hypothetically that Marcoasd chose to become a tutor. Then he speaks fluent Italian and so taking on a tutee who also speaks fluent Italian would be a great match, and so on.

    ---

    Alright so once we figure out how long a pairing should last, I think we're almost good to go. We also need to decide on how to manage the feedback process.
     
  12. PhilosopherKing

    PhilosopherKing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    125
    The idea of offering different course levels did not imply that tutors would be separated by skill level. I am not sure where you draw that conclusion based on what I said. Course levels separate students, NOT tutors.

    My point was that course levels make it easier for students to get the individualized attention they need in whatever skill level they find themselves while also giving tutors a more universal approach with the population of students assigned to them. Depending on how many students sign-up, a tutor could easily be overwhelmed with keeping track of each student's progress due to the wide variety of skill sets. Simply knowing, for example, that all five of your students are at the same Beginner level, means you can prepare a lot better for each tutoring session.

    In the end, the tutor absolutely should be qualified to teach at ANY course level. Perhaps, instead of offering formal courses, those who wish to enter the tutoring program should state their skill level based on the spectrum of Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced. That way, we accomplish the same goal of pooling students while also giving tutors the freedom to select at what level they want to teach.
     
  13. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    I don't think there is a one size fits all answer for how long a pairing lasts. We all teach differently, we all learn differently and progress will come at a different pace for each individual. Some people I could teach up to the intermediate level meeting twice a week in just two to three weeks. Another person I could meet them four times a week for two months and they'd still not be quite there. We should basically continue working with people until we either get the good outcome (the tutee is where they want to be and the tutor feels he or she has very little remaining they can teach the tutee) or the bad outcome (progress is no longer being made and the tutor probably cannot help the tutee any further). If a pairing simply isn't working for whatever reason, there is no reason a tutee can't go back into the pool and try their luck with someone else that may be a better fit for them.

    The second part... Obviously we should take as many qualified, active, genuinely helpful tutors as we can get. Having too many of those is a very good, and very unrealistic, problem to have.
     
  14. PhilosopherKing

    PhilosopherKing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    125
    In regards to the feedback process, I think it should be completely voluntary. If someone has any concerns about their tutor, there should be a designated person for a student to contact who can then bring the matter for review for the council in the relevant tier. This should obviously be done anonymously so as to prevent retaliation. If the council decides by majority vote that there is enough evidence to warrant removing a tutor based on the provided feedback, the council will alert the tutor and provide its reasoning. The tutor can appeal and a second review by the council can take place if new evidence warrants. Otherwise, the initial decision by the council for the relevant tier is final.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
    Disaster Area and CALLOUS like this.
  15. Ariel Rebel

    Ariel Rebel #1 rsutton23 Fan Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2017
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    83
    Separating beginner, intermediate, and advanced is a good idea for students in terms of helping how a tutor will prepare and be able to respond to the student's needs.

    A tutor not being able to teach at the advanced level wouldn't be so much of an issue for teaching a beginner. However, not being able to teach at the advanced level to someone in the intermediate area would certainly pose as an issue because the tutor is not far enough ahead of the student in this case.

    From my own experiences, I've found that a student-tutor relationship isn't the best for players of roughly the same skill level. In a student-tutor relationship, there is a lot less critique by the student and the student is (for the most part) willing to accept what the tutor has to say. For players of roughly the same skill level, critique and debate is important; otherwise, it could develop a more passive attitude by either player.

    Edit: on another note, I love this idea. Getting over that hurdle in RBY is something I've wanted to cross off my list. Being able to perform well against the top GSC players is another one. Also trying to pick up ADV an DPP. Not as good at those ones though.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
    Disaster Area and CALLOUS like this.
  16. Lutra

    Lutra Site Founder Owner

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,076
    Likes Received:
    309
    Problem is tutors have less opportunity to improve (if they want to) if they get no feedback, which probably lowers standards. I guess maybe you could counter this by giving a job to someone to collect live feedback, so it's a lot more comfortable a process than filling out a form, and so people will want to give feedback more.
     
  17. eden's embrace

    eden's embrace YOU ARE MY DESTINY Host Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2014
    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    390
    I don't think there's a dearth of at least "good" tutors in any tier personally. It'll come down to how willing both the tutor and the student are. At least from my side if I were to tutor, I'd want to tutor someone who has at least some reasonable background at ADV beforehand, so this stuff about beginner/intermediate/advanced is pretty relevant. I do strongly think that all the tutors, themselves should perhaps be able to do at least intermediate level stuff. I'd also suggest pairing a student/teacher who have a noticeable skill gap, you'd probably have much less friction that way. I think this'll work as long as inactivity and people's egos don't get in the way. Have at it guys!

    Let's also decide whether council members can be tutors, and whether that signifies a conflict of interest and stuff.

    I think if you want private discussion do it in a group PM. I strongly dislike private forums as a concept anyway, especially on here.

    I reckon we should be able to start up shortly though, exciting times :)
     
    CALLOUS likes this.
  18. musicaltide

    musicaltide riverflower Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2016
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    60
    Tutoring sounds like a fantastic idea, and I'm certain there are many new players out there who would appreciate the guidance of more experienced battlers (having encountered interested players on the ladder before).

    However, I want to nitpick on one aspect: the beginning/intermediate/advanced level a potential student would enroll in. Separating a student's desire to get to a beginner or intermediate level would be very useful to know, but how does one distinguish the intermediate level of teaching from the advanced level? I can only speak in terms of ADV 1U, but I would think anything being taught to an advanced student would not be a far stretch for the intermediate student either, whether it be specific Lax EVs or trying to fit at least one phazer on a team (disregarding Skarm, which is easily taken out by Magneton to consistently rely on). As of now, I have a hard time imagining what information would be considered an exclusively "advanced"-level concept that an intermediate student would not be able to grasp.

    I also believe that the best learning experiences happen when there is a notable skill gap between student and tutor. However, I'm not sure how well this applies to intermediate-level students who wish to learn at the advanced level, as the skill gap between teacher and student should not be too drastic. As Ariel noted, this may easily lead to passivity from either side.

    Instead, I'd like to suggest just two levels a student could approach: casual and competitive. Casual players may be those who find joy in using a select few teams or mons, and would like to win more ladder games (and maybe even a tour match or two). But, they understands they are fundamentally playing for "fun" and have no desire in diving deeper into the more competitive aspect of things (teambuilding, piloting a variety teams, etc.). For these players, a rough understanding of the current meta and matchups, as well as decent prediction, would be all they would need and want to learn.

    In contrast, competitive players could be those who are willing to dedicate a significant portion of their time and energy into learning all the tricks of the trade. They would be the players aiming to top the ladder and win tour games consistently. There is a subdivision between a complete "beginner" vs. an "experienced" player who have played their fair share of games, and students noting whether they are the former or latter would be helpful in pairing them up with the right tutors.

    Again, this boils down to the distinction between the "intermediate" and "advanced" level. Personally, I think a lot of the best players reached the highest level by playing a ton of games, being self-critical of said games (whether wins or losses), and discussing things with other good players - the former two being impossible for a tutor to provide, and the latter being achievable outside of a tutor program. If no formal line between these levels of skill can be drawn, then it may be worth considering the casual/competitive division instead, with a subdivision for "beginner" and "experienced" for the competitive level.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2017
  19. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    Even beginner is competitive, it just comes from much less background / experience. Strongly oppose calling it 'casual'.

    I don't think most people are going to be able to teach the advanced level, advanced level is really about finessing your play above anything else to my mind, as well as maybe some skills. I think the 3 distinctions are best. Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced should probably be considered more a description of the tutee's level before tutoring than the level to which the player wishes to attain...
     
  20. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    If I were a tutor I'd make my tutee be able to attain and maintain 1400 or better on ladder. I don't feel that needs a label. I'd get them to a point where they're competent and can hold their own. Call that whatever you want.
     
  21. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I'd call that the upper end of beginner
     
    musicaltide likes this.
  22. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    Under that logic you don't even qualify as a beginner.
     
  23. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I ladder with semi-gimmicks half the time and I'm usually around 1300-1400. If I tried, I could hit 1500 and maintain around 1400-1500. I think that level is sort of where the upper end of beginner should be aiming at.

    If you're starting your tutoring at having already attained that level, intermediate is probably suitable for you.

    I guess here's a good heuristic for what level you should be at for each of the levels:
    Beginner - No prerequisites
    Intermediate - Can maintain around 1400 on ladder. Wins the occasional series in a tournament setting.
    Advanced - Can comfortably reach the top of the ladder. Goes deep into most tournaments and maybe sometimes wins the whole thing.
     
    musicaltide and Ariel Rebel like this.
  24. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    5,385
    Likes Received:
    2,232
    I'm gonna sign up to tutor RBY after exams are over ^_^
     
    Ariel Rebel and Cowboy Dan like this.
  25. CALLOUS

    CALLOUS YouTube.com/CALLOUSnarrates Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2016
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    549
    I resign from my position as ADV tutor council leader as well as any other involvement with the program.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page