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RBY An Introduction To Violet, A Modified RBY Metagame

Discussion in 'Analysis and Research' started by Disaster Area, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Disaster Area

    Disaster Area Little Ball of Fur and Power Member

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    Introduction

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Violet is a modified RBY metagame originally made by Kristoph, which I was heavily involved in the testing and to a lesser extent also the design of. It was originally playable on Kristoph's own PS Server, and now is playable on Pokemon Perfect's Server. A full list of changes is available here and the Viability Rankings thread can be found here.

    The idea behind Violet was to modify RBY in numerous small ways, for example by buffing or changing some moves, changing the types of a few Pokemon, and so on. The main guiding principles included:
    - Players should be able to use a fairly standard team from RBY OU in the metagame and not be put at a big disadvantage for doing so, so that players can use and tweak those teams slowly so get used to the metagame.
    - The roster of Pokemon shouldn't be too large. Pokemon aren't generally artificially differentiated: if two Pokemon are very similar, for example Rhydon and Golem, or Vileplume and Victreebel and Venusaur, only one of those Pokemon will be included. Part of the motivation for this is to reduce the amount that needs to be learnt for those who wish to get into the game. There are 42 Pokemon included, many of which are staple or niche members of OU already.
    - Most changes should be smaller and make reasonable sense. For example, Leech Life is buffed, but only to become a 60 BP move that heals 100% of the damage dealt. It's definitely a strong move but it's also certainly not overpowered. Some mechanics are modified (one might say modernised), for example there are no 255s (so those 100% accurate moves won't miss now), and the type chart is closer to that of later generations (for example, Poison now resists Bug rather than being weak to it, and Fire resists Ice). Team Preview is also on.

    In this introduction, I will provide a look at the changes to moves, the roster of Pokemon, and provide a couple of sample teams you can use.

    Moves

    A number of attacks were simply buffed, providing better Bug-, Fighting-, Flying-, Ghost-, Grass-, Poison-, and Rock-type attacking options, as well as introducing a Dragon-type option in Thrash. Toxic's accuracy was also buffed to 100%. (Any changes are listed in brackets)

    Bug-Type: Twineedle (40 BP per hit (still 20% poison chance per hit)), Vice Grip (high critical hit ratio)
    Dragon-Type: Thrash (100 BP (repeats 2-3 turns, then confuses user))
    Fighting Type: Karate Chop, Submission (100% Accuracy, 100 BP)
    Ghost-Type: Tri Attack
    Grass-Type: Petal Dance (120 BP (repeats 2-3 turns, then confuses user))
    Flying-Type: Gust (80 BP, Flying-Type, 30% chance to lower Attack)
    Poison-Type: Acid (70 BP, 50% chance to lower Defense), Poison Sting (95 BP, 30% chance to poison), Toxic (100% Accuracy)
    Rock-Type: Rock Slide (85 BP)

    A couple of draining moves were buffed too. I think this is one of the neatest changes in Violet; it is very powerful in spite of being used on attacks that are 40 or 60 BP.

    Leech Life: 60 BP, heals 100% of damage dealt
    Mega Drain: Heals 100% of damage dealt

    A couple of moves with a charge turn were also buffed. Solar Beam turns Moltres (which gains access to the move in Violet) into a powerful and dangerous sweeper.

    Sky Attack: +1 Defense during charge turn
    Solar Beam: 100 BP, +1 Special during charge turn

    Partial trapping moves were also tweaked in Violet. Overall they now have higher power and lower PP: this is meant improve their utility in enabling switches, and reduce their sweeping potential. Note that Bind is now Bug-type.

    Bind: 40 BP, 8 PP, Partial trapping for 2-3 turns (Accuracy remains 75)
    Clamp: 70 BP, 5 PP, Partial trapping for 2-3 turns (Accuracy remains 75)
    Fire Spin: 30 BP, 8 PP, Partial trapping for 2-3 turns (Accuracy remains 70)
    Wrap: 40 BP, 8 PP, partial trapping for 2-3 turns (Accuracy remains 85)

    There are also 3 moves with unique functionality in Violet: Mimic, Disable, and Dream Eater. The change to Dream Eater is so drastic that it is the signature feature of a new style of offense that only exists within Violet!

    Mimic: Mimicked moves remain on the user’s moveset even if the user switches out. Jynx, Flareon, Articuno, Magneton, Dugtrio, and Pidgeot are now the only users of Mimic.
    Disable: 100 Accuracy, 3 PP. Disabled moves remain Disabled indefinitely, even if the Disabled Pokemon switches out. If you try to Disable a second move, the second move will be successfully Disabled, but the first move will no longer be Disabled. Tangela, Ninetales, and Muk are now the only users of Disable.
    Dream Eater: 200 BP, Ghost-Type, works against sleeping, poisoned, or badly poisoned targets, heals 100% of damage dealt.

    Pokemon

    Most OU Pokemon are also included in Violet (only Lapras, Jolteon, and Rhydon are not included) but whilst some have remained largely the same (like Tauros or Chansey) but with less presence overall, some have gotten smaller buffs or even changed quite dramatically (like Gengar which has a new-found life in the format). I'll be looking at the Pokemon in 12 mostly distinct groups, hopefully making the information easier to digest, with their Viability Rank written in brackets next to ther sprites.

    The Normal-Types

    [​IMG] (S), [​IMG] (A+),[​IMG] (A-), [​IMG](C-)​

    Being a Normal-type is uniquely useful in Violet for the immunity to Dream Eater it grants, in addition to granting STAB on Body Slam (which now can paralyze Normal-types) and Hyper Beam. Chansey, Snorlax, and Tauros are all each excellent but none of them are mandatory in this metagame due to the diversity of viable strategies. There are more viable Rock-, Ghost-, and Fighting-types, which certainly helps to reduce their dominance. The main change in Chansey's sets is that it now sometimes runs Toxic, due to its utility on Dream Eater-focused teams. Snorlax and Tauros are still mostly the same as in RBY OU, although there is maybe greater merit in running an Electric-type attack on Tauros due to the existence of a Water- and Ghost-type in Golduck, or running an Amnesia + Blizzard Snorlax due to the common presence of Aerodactyl. Pidgeot gains a lot in Violet, although it nonetheless finds itself at the bottom of the viability rankings. Its Attack and Special are significantly boosted whilst its Speed is bumped up to 100, and it has improved Gust, Toxic, Sky Attack, and Mimic.

    Aerodactyl

    [​IMG] (S)​

    Aerodactyl gained 3 things in Violet, which catapulted it up to being one of the 4 best Pokemon in Violet. It gains Rock Slide, Softboiled (mirroring its access to Roost in later generations), as well as the buff on Sky Attack, turning it into a dangerous threat given how few Rock-resists there are in Violet. At least that helps improve the viability of Fighting-types, and Nidoqueen and Golem are good answers to it too. Its incredible speed and Softboiled make it very difficult to KO, although landing paralysis or a burn on it certainly makes it more manageable.

    Dream Eater Users

    [​IMG] (S), [​IMG](B+), [​IMG](B-), [​IMG](C+)​

    Dream Eater abuse is a unique style of offense in Violet. The concept is to run at least one Pokemon with access to Dream Eater, with a Sleeper and users of Toxic as partners. Gengar is the fastest sleeper with access to Dream Eater, and whilst it has quite low Attack and Hypnosis' accuracy is quite poor (although all Dream Eater users have Hypnosis if they have a sleep move at all) STAB in combination with a surprisingly deep movepool makes it a versatile threat in the metagame which in addition checks a good number of threats (especially more niche picks). The full list of moves it can commonly be seen running includes Hypnosis, Dream Eater, Toxic, Psychic, Thunderbolt, Mega Drain, Night Shade, and Explosion! Gengar in particular struggles with Chansey and Snorlax due to their immunity to Dream Eater and good special bulk. Hypno (with Submission) and Poliwrath (with Karate Chop or Submission) don't have that problem. However, their lower Speed limits them. They're also quite versatile: Hypno has a buffed Attack stat combined access to Tri Attack and Meditate, and Poliwrath has Water- and Ice-type moves, and so they both stand out in their own ways. Beedrill is the only Dream Eater user without a Sleep move, and can hardly do anything to a Gengar which isn't put to Sleep, but its STABs Twineedle and Poison Sting both have a chance to Poison the opponent, which in combination with its high Speed, passable Attack, and low defenses make it very do or die, but it certainly is not the joke that it is in standard RBY.

    Fire-Types

    [​IMG] (S), [​IMG] (A-), [​IMG] (B+), [​IMG](B-), [​IMG] (B-)​

    There are 5 Fire-types, and each one's typing is different! Charizard is retyped to Fire/Dragon, leaving Moltres as the only Fire/Flying type, whilst Flareon is the only pure Fire-type as Ninetales becomes Fire/Psychic and Magmar becomes Fire/Fighting. There are of course further differences beyond that too. Moltres is one of the best Pokemon in the metagame due to its access to Solar Beam in tandem with great stats, STAB Fire Blast, and a few other more minor tools. Ninetales has access to the rare support move Disable. Charizard's typing lets it take Fire- and Grass-type attacks with ease, and it can utilise Slash, Swords Dance, and Thrash for a variety of different offensive approaches, from hit and run to boosting sweeper to Thrash-abusing cleaner. Flareon is the bulkiest and the most physically powerful, but also the slowest and without a physical STAB or a boosting move. It does however have a cute move option in Mimic, and whilst the rest of its moves are very run of the mill Normal- or Fire-type attacks or moves like Rest, its excellent stats ensure that it's viable. Magmar has high speed and a handful of coverage options (namely Vice Grip and Psychic on top of its STABs) that turn it into a capable mixed sweeper, but a handful of Pokemon, including Aerodactyl, give it some trouble. Still, it can at least burn those switch-ins, which can certainly be useful.

    Bug- and Grass-type Utility

    [​IMG] (A+), [​IMG] (A+), [​IMG](A-), [​IMG] (C+), [​IMG](C+)​

    4 of the 9 Pokemon with access to sleep moves (besides Jynx, all of the Pokemon with access to sleep moves more accurate than Hypnosis) are Grass- or Bug-types. Tangela is the odd one out here - it loses access to Sleep Powder in Violet, but gains access to Disable (which only it, Ninetales, and Muk have access to), as well as Bind, combines with a useful pure Grass typing, making it a great pivot. Exeggutor is much the same as it is in OU, and while a buffed Mega Drain certainly helps it further, the increased amount of Fire-, Bug-, Poison-, and Ghost-type attacks more than balances that out. Butterfree competes with Exeggutor a lot; whilst it lacks Explosion, a Grass-type STAB, and is weak to Rock, the access to STAB Leech Life, lack of Ice-type weakness, and higher speed puts it on the same level. Butterfree is an excellent answer to most other Psychic-types too, which naturally is a tremendous niche. Vileplume struggles to stand out compared with these two, but its stats all around aren't bad and STAB Acid can certainly hurt things. Parasect has excellent bulk and power, but the worst speed and possibly worst typing of all of the Pokemon listed here. However, Spore never misses, and it can do more than merely act as a support Pokemon. It has two separate boosting options in Swords Dance and Solar Beam, but ultimately all variants need support getting through Gengar, it is awfully slow, and other Pokemon such as Pinsir might do similar things more effectively.

    Ground-Types

    [​IMG] (A+), [​IMG] (A-), [​IMG](B-)​

    The 3 Ground-types are each radically different. Nidoqueen is a mid-speed Poison- and Ground-type with access to Softboiled and a decent array of coverage moves, and is one of the best answers available to Aerodactyl. Golem is much slower, with STAB Rock Slide and Explosion, and is the better Zapdos and Fire-type answer, but its reliance on physical attacks makes switching into Aerodactyl's Fire Blast risky business and Nidoqueen's single-turn recovery is envious. Dugtrio is an entirely different sort of Pokemon to both Nidoqueen and Golem. It doesn't defensively handle much reliably; indeed, Aerodactyl is an answer to it rather than the other way around as is the case with its fellow Ground-types. However, it is a decent fast offensive Pokemon and the buff to Rock Slide and type change of Tri Attack certainly are appreciable. It is still certainly very frail but Violet does bring with it an Attack boost.

    The Classic Psychic-Types

    [​IMG](A+), [​IMG](B+), [​IMG](B+), [​IMG] (B-)​

    For Starmie, Alakazam, Slowbro, and Jynx, nothing has really changed for them (except for Jynx's access to Violet's modified Mimic). What has changed for them is the increasing preseence of Ghost- and Bug-type moves (including Dream Eater), other Psychic-types (including Butterfree which eats all 4 alive), and a plethora of Toxic and Fire Blasts being thrown around (which is potentially an asset for Starmie and Alakazam). The introduction for Dream Eater is a big problem for Slowbro in particular - it gets eaten alive by it and there are whole teams based around abusing it.

    Water-Types

    [​IMG](A-), [​IMG](B+), [​IMG](B+), [​IMG] (C+)​

    Each of these 4 Water-types is changed and unique in different ways. Gyarados merely gains extra coverage options - Tri Attack letting it pummel Gengar, Sky Attack which is monstrous with its high Attack stat and STAB, and Thrash which although not a great move on Gyarados notably is unresistd by anything in the metagame. It struggles fitting everything it wants on its moveset - Hydro Pump, Tri Attack, Thunderbolt, Sky Attack, Body Slam, and Hyper Beam are all excellent. Its speed is subpar but it's made up for in part by raw power. Cloyster benefits also from gaining access to Tri Attack, letting it do damage to Starmie as well as Slowbro (and Golduck!). Clamp is an even greater asset for it now - although it's not an option to try and sweep with any more (though its poor accuracy always made that unreliable anyway) its very high power (for a partial trapping move at least) and very low PP make it designed to be an effective pivot and do a lot of damage in the process. Golduck is now a Water/Ghost-type, gaining Tri Attack as a STAB option. It doesn't do anything more than merely make use of that powerful typing, but that's enough to make it useful, certainly. Kabutops gets only one new tool, which is a little sad for the lowest tiered fully evolved Water-type in PP's RBY tiering, but it is a good tool. Kabutops now has a Rock-type STAB in Rock Slide, which is pretty dangerous in combination with Swords Dance, Slash, Hyper Beam, Hydro Pump, and a fairly unique typing.

    Electric-Types

    [​IMG](B+), [​IMG] (B-), [​IMG](B-), [​IMG](B-)​

    Zapdos is still Zapdos, but the introduction of Softboiled Nidoqueen as well as other more viable Pokemon certainly hurt its viability somewhat, though it can still do damage. It does however appreciate the Sky Attack buff. Golem and Magneton are its best answers, but they fold much more easily versus Electabuzz, which also has an easy time versus Chansey due to its STAB Submission, though it struggles versus Exeggutor and Tangela, whilst Dugtrio and Gengar can give it a hard time. Electrode struggles with all of those Pokemon (besides Gengar) and more, but at least the stat boost makes its Explosion more able to hurt. Being a Flying-type resist that outspeeds Aerodactyl enables it to pair well with Fighting-types such as Poliwrath to form a solid offensive anti-Aero core. In total, even though it hasn't gained much in the grand scheme of things, it's surprisingly capable of putting in work. Magneton gains a secondary Rock-typing, immitating its Steel-type in later generations. It certainly opens as well as closes doors for it, but in combation with a massive HP buff and access to Mimic it can make something of itself defensively if nothing else.

    Articuno, Dragonite, Pinsir

    [​IMG](B+), [​IMG](B-), [​IMG](C+)​

    Articuno appreciates the introduction of new Mimic mechanics to Violet, as well as the buff to Sky Attack. Whilst it's no standout in the metagame it can certainly do some damage, but it is still largely as one-dimensional as it always was. Dragonite however has a new tool to play with. Thrash is surprisingly deadly in combination with Agility. It hits hard, especially backed up by STAB and Dragonite's surprisingly great base 100 Special, and with an Agility boost it can be really tough to stop once it gets going, though the confusion downside can be limiting. The traditional Wrapnite is dead anyway with the change to Wrap's BP and PP making it insufficient to sweep with, and the new Dragonite is a different kind of sweeper. Pinsir gains a bunch of tools but the inability to really hurt Gengar thanks to the type chart change making Bug not very effective against Poison. Amongst its new tools however include Vice Grip - a Bug-type move with a high critical hit ratio, Bind - a Bug-type partial trapping move, and a buff to the power and accuracy of Submission.


    Machamp and Primeape

    [​IMG](C+),[​IMG](C+)​

    The two pure Fighting-types, Machamp and Primeape, do struggle to stand out a little against the rest of the pack. Magmar and Electabuzz occupy a similar niche to Primeape - fast Fighting-type attacker with a number of coverage options - but it has a better time against Moltres than Magmar and is significantly faster than Electabuzz (getting the jump on Gengar, Starmie, Alakazam, and Magmar). Machamp occupies the slow hard-hitter with coverage niche, but Poliwrath has many more options than it, due to Hypnosis, Dream Eater, Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, and the Special to be able to use them effectively. Slightly buffed stats in addition to buffed Submission (and Karate Chop) certainly help make it no joke, but it needs serious paralysis support to function effectively.

    The Niche Poison-Types

    [​IMG](C-),[​IMG](C-), [​IMG](C-)
    Finally, we come to 3 of the 4 Pokemon sitting in C- rank. They all have interesting and unique traits but each certainly has its flaws too. Arbok is maybe the best of these: with decent enough Attack and Speed, as well as Glare, Earthquake, Poison Sting, and two partial trapping options in Bind and Wrap, it certainly has a number of decent tools to work with. But its poor typing granting it few switch-ins certainly does it no favours as something of a support Pokemon. Golbat doesn't really know what it is; it has a unique typing that at least makes it excellent versus Grass- and Fighting-types as well as at least some kind of check to Dugtrio, but its stats are pretty average across the board. Acid and Gust provide STAB coverage and Super Fang means it can certainly do some damage if you get it in, but ultimately it's quite difficult to use with little reward. Muk probably suffers the most of any Pokemon besides perhaps Pinsir from Gengar-syndrome, struggling to do meaningful damage to it, and its typing offers very little defensively, and it's slow, but once you get past all of that it's not too shabby. Disable, Explosion, Acid, a Snorlax-esque Base HP Stat of 145, and a couple of other tricks is actually pretty nice overall, but it definitely isn't straightforward to get good use out of it.

    Teams

    I made a couple of sample teams to help you get into the metagame. They use top Pokemon and should have lines of play against any opposing Pokemon.

    Team 1 - Aerodactyl Balance

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Butterfree
    - Leech Life
    - Psychic
    - Sleep Powder
    - Stun Spore

    Aerodactyl
    - Rock Slide
    - Fire Blast
    - Soft-Boiled
    - Sky Attack

    Nidoqueen
    - Soft-Boiled
    - Earthquake
    - Blizzard
    - Body Slam

    Snorlax
    - Body Slam
    - Earthquake
    - Hyper Beam
    - Self-Destruct

    Starmie
    - Recover
    - Psychic
    - Blizzard
    - Thunder Wave

    Tauros
    - Body Slam
    - Hyper Beam
    - Blizzard
    - Earthquake

    This team looks and feels quite similar to a standard RBY team in some ways. 2 of RBY OU's big 4, Starmie, and Butterfree which is quite similar to Exeggutor. There's 3 recover users plus the fairly self-sufficient Butterfree. The way it plays should be close to that of a standard RBY team but with new options from Violet.

    Team 2 - Moltres Balance

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Moltres
    - Fire Blast
    - Solar Beam
    - Rest
    - Sky Attack

    Snorlax
    - Body Slam
    - Earthquake
    - Hyper Beam
    - Self-Destruct

    Chansey
    - Thunder Wave
    - Soft-Boiled
    - Seismic Toss
    - Reflect

    Exeggutor
    - Sleep Powder
    - Stun Spore
    - Psychic
    - Explosion

    Starmie
    - Recover
    - Thunderbolt
    - Blizzard
    - Thunder Wave

    Golem
    - Earthquake
    - Rock Slide
    - Explosion
    - Body Slam

    This team is also quite similar to a standard RBY OU team: replace Moltres with Tauros and you have one in fact. The idea behind this team is simply to make best use of Moltres. Snorlax supports it well by landing status and threatening to Self-Destruct on it too, and can chip Rock-types such as Golem and Kabutops which also helps Moltres. Chansey, and indeed the remainder of the team, is well-built to spread paralysis and cover common threats in the metagame too. Some set variations are definitely possible: an AmnesiaLax is a different approach to bothering Aerodactyl, and a boltbeam Chansey works fine here too, with Psychic over Thunderbolt on Starmie. Seismic Toss on Chansey does help force opposing Moltres to rest however for Golem to abuse. Rest is also an option to consider on Golem over Body Slam: Golem ends up burnt a lot by Aerodactyl and Moltres, so it has utility in this metagame.

    Team 3 - Dream Eater Abuse

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Gengar
    - Hypnosis
    - Psychic
    - Dream Eater
    - Toxic

    Poliwrath
    - Karate Chop
    - Dream Eater
    - Hydro Pump
    - Toxic

    Hypno
    - Toxic
    - Psychic
    - Dream Eater
    - Submission

    Tangela
    - Disable
    - Toxic
    - Bind
    - Mega Drain

    Electrode
    - Thunderbolt
    - Explosion
    - Toxic
    - Rest

    Moltres
    - Fire Blast
    - Solar Beam
    - Agility
    - Fire Spin

    Of course, many Violet teams won't / shouldn't look similar to RBY OU teams. No truer is that than for Dream Eater-centric teams. This team features 3 of the 4 Dream Eater users, alongside 2 partial trappers and an Electrode. One interesting feature to note is that versus common Sky Attack users (Aerodactyl, Articuno, and Gyarados), Electrode should not generally be the initial switch-in - that is up to usually Poliwrath or Tangela. But should they switch in and those Pokemon choose to use Sky Attack rather than a single-turn move, Electrode can then switch in fairly safely afterwards, and force the offending Pokemon out due to its high Speed and STAB Thunderbolt. It can't necessarily do this trick repeatedly; critical hit Sky Attacks will do a lot of damage, but due to the two-turn nature of the move and mindgames involved, Electrode shouldn't need to do this trick repeatedly. Electrode's last move is not very important here and can be changed to Thunder Wave, Screech, or Hyper Beam as per your preference.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2018
    LUX and deluks917 like this.

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